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the problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
of the excheck kerr. >> mr. speaker, it's taking time, but the british economy is healing. [laughter] after the biggest financial crash of our lifetime, people know that we face each problem at home and abroad. at home we live with the decades of debt and the failure to equip britain to compete in the modern world. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as,
've spent a good deal of your career working on, mr. hall, has been the improvement of the american economy. and tonight i'd like to join a couple of my colleagues on the democratic side to talk about the economy and specifically to talk about jobs and the things that we can do here in the a winning days of this congress -- wanning days of this congress to create some job opportunities. we've got some very heavy lifting here in congress in the next month and a half. everybody wants to talk about the fiscal cliff, some talk about austerity, bomb, others talk about what needs to be done to lift the debt limit. and all of these issues are before us. tax increases are not. but underlying all of that, foundational to all of that, is putting america back to work. getting americans back into their jobs. if we do that we will clearly increase employment and when you increase employment you always increase tax revenue to the federal government, to state governments and local governments. so our principle task as i see it and i think i'm joined by many of my colleagues, both democratic and republican
. >> by growing the economy. just a couple numbers. already in this meager economic recovery, we've increased revenue to the federal government by $344 billion. if we just return to a normal economy, like we had in 2007, under president bush, where proven was 18.5% of our economy, that would raise another $400 billion per year. the president's proposal right now, the highest estimated is $75 billion, a tenth of that. economic growth is 10 finals more effective at raising revenue. the problem with punishing success, the problem with the president's proposal, it will put that economic growth at risk. you know, i think the best question really is, what is the president's plan? show us your plan. this is about returning confidence to the economy. >> greta: a plan to rev up the economy or a plan for spending cuts? >> a plan for reducing the deficit which actually would return certainty to the economy, restore confidence, which would help economic growth. punishing success will not do that. temporary tax increases don't do that as well. >> greta: it's interesting, almost seems like a game of chicke
because the underlying fundamentals in the u.s. economy are clearly improving, and you also have a stabilization or soft landing happening in china at the same time. >> david kelly, what do you want to be doing here? what's your strategy for the fiscal cliff? do you think we go over it, and what do you want to do? >> for a long-term investor, you don't try and play this one. i agree with stephanie about the market probably going higher once they get a resolution. they will get a resolution. it's possible it could go into early january. i still think they're more likely to get a resolution done before the end of the year. either way, they'll get a resolution done. when that happens, then we'll resort to looking at the u.s. economy, which is strengthening a bit here. also, the extreme and relative valuations between high-quality fixed income and equities will push money towards equities. i would not run for cover here because of the volatility. i think you just have to, you know, hold your ground through this and hope that the market moves higher next year. >> bob, this activity at
, it is not a recession, it has been building for decade-sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and the average american to rise. to make the u.s. less competitive, less attractive for business, we go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again because unless we get the economy really moving and growing in a long run, these budget problems will occur over and over again. we have identified eight areas where we find, these things would move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two or three or four years we start to see impact and there's quite bipartisan support. and the sustainable budget compromise. number 2, easing immigration now. we need a broader immigration reform, but it is one of the abilities to move rapidly to inject skill to the economy to fill jobs we badly need to fill to sustain our growth. it is not long term solution to the skill problem in america but a critical step we need to take to move the needle. we have got to simplify and realize the corporate tax code. everybody agrees. we just did a survey that included a loss of members of the general p
, investors in the financial markets and the real economy, you need sustainability and credibility. the problem with the european union for the time being is that decisionmaking is not sustainable. the united states has a common economic area with a common currency. one central bank, one parliament, and one government. the european union has an economic area with one currency, one central bank, and 17 governments in the eurozone. how the fine trust when you have every day after the decision making, another government -- how you can find an investor going to greece, today you invest in euros. tomorrow, the currency of greece, nobody knows. what kind of investment will go to greece. the biggest problem is not to fill the gap in the public coffers of greece. my eyes, it is a credit crunch in some of the countries. i met the chairman of the greek chamber of commerce when i was there and he'd tell me we have about 300 small and middle sized companies. ferry transport is a very important element of the greek economy. in the health-care system, whatever. most of the jobs are created in sm
's really thinking that we're going to get this full 3.5%, 4% gdp hit smack into the economy on january 1st. the problem is that time is marching on. we've had the election, we've had thanksgiving. the excuses are running out. the lame-duck session is only so long. that's probably why the markets are getting nervous. although you may get a deal done in q-1 rather than in q-4, the fact that it actually hits from january 1st is going to keep business very cautious, very defensive and that's going to worry the equity market. >> it's interesting because it also comes against the landscape where we've seen chinese equities underperform, they reminded us very few of its member countries have great growth prospects going forward. that's probably wise. people are saying why is it that across the globe the u.s. fiscal cliff is such an issue. well, it's because sources of growth at this point are few and far between. >> that is the problem. where is growth going to come from. the one place that looked set for a reasonable 2013 was the u.s. economy. europe flat, china slower probably than this year. b
that marie solving insolvent firms easier. crucial agreement for restructuring the economy in this transition period as resources must shift from unproductive to productive activities. it is the latter that create jobs. this reallocation process, though sometimes painful in the short run, i'll say always painful in the short run, carries the seed of future prosperity. a growing body of knowledge shows that by increasing the ability of the economy to adjust so that factors can be reallocated to the most competitive firms, aggregate labor productivity can increase substantially. some studies indicate a gain of as much as 20 force 30%. the current focus on competitiveness in france leading towards an institutional and fiscal set up that can support firms investment in innovation is therefore a welcome step in the right direction. another important aspect is the growth and competitiveness enhancing potential of further market integration in europe. one example is a very recent study which finds that applying the eu patent would raise the gains for european firms from patent and inventions by 60%.
different elements of our economy deal with d.h.s. with support of others coming up with what would be best business practices and then if those best business practices were adopted by those within that element of the economy, they would get liability protection, liability immunity. now, some say, wait a second. that leads to a slippery slope that the government will come in and crash in on you. i don't know the perfect answer but i can trying for the lightest regulatory approach we could have. and those worried about the federal government coming in heavy-handed are truly concerned about that, they ought to think about this. if we have a successful cyberattack against a part of our critical infrastructure, my fear is that congress and whoever's present at the time will overreact because the public will require it. wouldn't it be better for us to anticipate it? wouldn't it be better for us to get ahead of the crises and then have a means by which we defend against it? we know we're not ever going to be totally 100% successful. so when it happens to diminish the impact on whatever critical i
revive the american economy if people are expected to take, they've already had 25% pay cut in six years. that's not the american dream and that's not the way you make an economy work. they're way and you have whack. >> you raised the issue of germany. many point to it's robust economy and manufacturing sector who would resist here worker representationen oh the board of directors. how has the actual representation impacted labor strife over in europe, for example? >> you know, there is some strife, but i think there is also more of a sense that we're all in this together. as you point out i mentioned germany, but it's, you know, france all the way through the nordic countries. the other thing that's key is in a newly emerging democracy like brazil the workers through collective bargaining is four to five times the level of the united states. you have rising wages millions of brazilian workers coming into middle income status, able to buy the things they produce and a growing economy in brazil. here, the micro system of each employer trying to maximize profits at the expense of employees
think the ramifications for the economy are too significant. i think we're watching whatever you want to call it, all of the politics playing out, but i still think in the end we'll get a last minute deal. >> i agree. and i think even though the sides are far apart, you have things on the table now. so you can say you're here at 800, 1.6, you kind of -- it gets you somewhere close. somebody will try to say 1.3 versus 1.1, but if you see publicly what they're stating and hopefully privately other things are going on, but it will get done, but it will be very slow. >> john boehner with the proposal he put on the table, i did see commentary from some of the far right saying this is not an acceptable proposal. even his proposal is not acceptable. i did see comment it ter that came through. my question is does the president now have to alienate some of his far left base in order to reach a compromise. >> i think you'll see both of them have to actually bring the parties together. because you won't get everybody happy. some of the people who got voted on the ticket side, no, never. but it w
it to some of the other developed economies, you can see how well australia is holding up. we've seen growth of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending.
. stuart: you agree with me, if this plan, anything like it from the president, were imposed on the economy at this time it would lead to recession. >> i think that the president is fully aware as are democrats and anybody realistic. stuart: you make that judgment. >> i am not a fan, by the way, never have been, i thought the fiscal cliff thing was ridiculous in the beginning. no, no, but prefacing my answer to you. stuart: higher taxes of this magnitude on an economy that's already weak with 8% unemployment, you do that and now it's not-- >> no, no, no, i do not believe that raising the marginal tax rates to the clinton rates for the wealthiest among us-- >> i knew you were going to say that, you're comparing a totally different economy. what we have now is 8% unemployment. very sluggish growth and a trillion dollar deficit every year. you propose to raise taxes in that environment and you're not going to get growth. >> don't you understand you need to off set-- if you're serious about debt reduction, i think you are, don't you understand you need revenue and spending cuts. stuart: and how
the economic brake and let this economy continue to build. it seems a little disorienting and ale disconcerting to hear that there may be some people in this congress who put their pledge to a special interest ahead of their pledge of allegiance to this country. and while we are beginning to see some cracks in that cement block that is the special interest group that has gotten these republican members to sign these no-tax pledges, there are not that many. you hear a high ranking republican in the house talking about telling his colleagues to join with president obama to move forward in preserving the tax rates for the middle-class. as the chairman just said, for everyone, including warren buffett, ross perot -- they would get tax relief for the first $250,000 of their income as well. you hear some republicans calling this pledge handcuffs that keep them from moving forward. we would hope in the short periodically have before december 31, we would not let a pledge to a special interest supersede the pledge of allegiance to make to our country. finally, once again, the american people are way ah
need to stimulate the economy. >> and you're talking about, when you take money out of small businesses? >> and adam, he deserves to answer your question. adam? >> he's talking about keeping taxes where they are for the straight majority of the country, charlie. he campaigned on this. he was elected on it, it doesn't matter. >> 50% of the vote on it. >> it doesn't matter, you know that as well as i do. it's only political. >> no, no, no, i'm not-- no, i'm not saying that, i'm saying that there's no rational reason. >> let me finish, charlie. >> and what is the rationality to treat a small business person who makes $250,000 a year and employs ten people just like steve jobs, warren buffett and-- >> and we quibble? >> let me finish. we can quibble about what the right amount is, whether it's $250,000 or whether it's 500,000, what the president is trying to do. >> and for a while, charles, help me with this part of it. whatever your views on taxes, and i think it's happening and ben stein's earlier point, it's there. and deeply disturbing, where is it, not only there's a lack of result to
for the american economy and says all the wrong signals to us signals to the market and international investors. also the demonstration of the sheer breathtaking arrogance of the obama presidency. this is a set of demands from an imperial white house. that simply is not open to any form of discussion at all according to these latest developments. this is a deeply worrying. the united states is on the edge of the economic abyss. the $16 trillion debt. so far there are no serious proposals whatsoever coming from the obama administration with regard to cutting this level of debt that the united states knows. america is heading for an economic catastrophe. it is a slow-moving sort of trained crash. gerri: i think that train is being of every single day. to you. imperial presidency. not only imperial. it's on hiatus. the talks have been outsourced. the very man who negotiated the biggest bailout of banks in u.s. history. i think his choice of a negotiator is even problematic at this point. >> i completely agree. if you think back to the start of the first administration, he had his problems getting
, we had huge surpluses because of the strong economy over the 1990's and deficit-reduction plans put in place over the 1990's. the government had the choice to spend that on programs, or returned it to tax payers, and the bush administration decided to return the money to taxpayers. over the following year's tax rates were lower. it was renewed in 2010 in a tax deal between president obama and congressional republicans at a time when the economy was weak and the feeling was they could not take an increase in taxes. host: what was the desired effect and did it happen? he called the desired effect was to give people more of their income back, and that happened, as wealthy people got more income back, more moderate income earners got some back. one of the questions is how it effects economic growth, and it is an unresolved area of economic research. did it did help the economy -- did it help the economy? it is hard to say. we had a good economy in the 2000's before the crisis. now we have a huge crisis. on balance, it probably did not help that much. host: can you calculate if jobs were
savings as part of that and invest in things that matter to the american economy. we think we can do that. we have a good chance to do it now. it's important that we do it. i think we're going to get there. >> given tough talk over the weekend, why aren't we waking up to down numbers, red arrows? >> europe is terrific. bond rates are phenomenal. a great run. china numbers are better. i think that there's a lot of people who feel like doug cast does who writes with me with a piece in "the new york times" saying that -- >> most stuff is nontaxable accounts any way. most stocks that people won't be as motivated to sell as people think. of course that doesn't necessarily deal with the increase in payroll taxes and the whole recession side of it. it does deal with the stock market side in terms of selling. >> why not say, listen, fiscal cliff, i have to cut numbers. i have to cut guidance. i think many ceos will cut guidance because of the possibility that the amt is going to -- this alternative minimum tax, people don't know they have to write a check for $3,500 at the end of the year. once y
two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's start with bigger of the two deals. freeport's purchase of plains. approximately $6.9 billion in total now. it's a cash and stock deal. .6531 shares and 39 bucks a share in cash. that adds up to $50
on to conservative principles very closely. for example, the need for what they call a pro-growth economy, like senator ron johnson. let me play for you what he had to say. >> this president simply doesn't understand that and as a result he's going to punish success, put at risk the economic growth that we really need to create jobs, revenue that we need. >> this is sort of the talking point that we've been hearing all along. is there any indication around capitol hill that there is some softening on that? >> i don't even know what that means, putting -- basically, i believe that the argument is that only by decreasing taxes can you lead to growth. there is a lot of historical evidence that that is not necessarily the case. i think the issue for the gchop right now is whether the tax cuts expire for everyone or whether for only those with income over $250,000. >> let me bring in jim from the national journal. jim, we had a little technical problem there. let me ask you about what she said said. can anything be decided at all until a decision is made about who is going to have tax cuts expire if
our economy. how to deal with them in a responsible way, get us passed this fiscal cliff, passed in august, only plan in washington, d.c., to prevent these debilitating tax increases from hitting across all of our family owned small businesses. finally, mr. speaker, h.r. 6365, it's the national security and job protection act. we passed that in september. that's the bill that looks specifically at these coming defense cuts. these cuts that secretary of defense leon panetta has called devastating in their impact. i know you do, mr. speaker, leon panetta, former chief of staff to president bill clinton, former chairman of the democratic-led budget committee here in the u.s. house of representatives, current secretary of defense calls these defense cuts devastating. this u.s. house has passed a proposal to prevent that second round of cuts from taking place. it's the only proposal anywhere in this town to have passed. we did in august. we took care of our business and we have yet to have partnership from either the white house or the senate. on that proposal. we took the sequester r
have to put the changes that happened well down the road because the economy's not ready to handle a lot of these changes in terms of cuts and things like that. but the idea that it feels like they're not going to do anything. you could wand ind up with the situation, let it all ride. we won't deal with any of it right now. >> republicans have had a good pint that tax increases are immediate and spending cuts are put off. >> when is a good time? they're talking about another four or five years of we're not going to be ready to have any type of austerity because it's still this huge debt overhang. what color is that tie? >> i don't know. red, i think. >> is it a red rutgers tie? >> not intentional. i completely forgot about the game. not having paid attention to the most important sports event of the year. >> they lost. but they played well. >> they showed up. i didn't see it, but i was happy they showed up. i have my rise above button back on because i thought i was going to have a rutgers button so which would not have allowed me to -- but now i had room for this. you got no sleep
pretty well here on the frankfurt floor because the unemployment rate showed that the german economy is still in very good shape. although economists are saying that the german economy also has a long way to go until it has bottomed out because the export business will be more difficult in the near future because of weak other economies, but consumption in germany is going up. >> let's get a closer look at those market numbers. germany's blue-chip dax was higher on the day by about 0.8%, closing at a nice, round number. the euro stoxx 50 also higher. the dow jones industrial average as high as well. the bureau is trading for $ 1.2973. >> a german bank is in trouble with the law. prosecutors raided 13 of the bank's locations, including its munich headquarters, in search of evidence of tax evasion. the bank is suspected of cheating the state out of 124 million euros. share transactions between 2006 and 2008 are the focus of the probe. the bank is not alone. investigators are currently looking into similar incidents of alleged tax evasion at other institutions. >> there's a lot of money
.s. gdp. it's been revised upwards. commerce department officials say the economy for the july to september quarter dp eer grew a annualized 2.7%. exports were revised to mark an increase of 1.1%. earlier predictions headed for fall of 1.6%. housing investment was revised slightly down toward to 14.2% but maintain strong growth. >>> consu consumer spending was revised down 0.6 points to a growth rate of 1.4%. overall gdp mark significant growth but uncertainty remains. consumption is growing. there is the fiscal cliff to consider. >>> now let's turn to japan. the jobless rate in october remained flat compared to the previous month. the internal affairs ministry said unemployment stayed at 4 4.2%. officials at the labor ministry say the ratio of job vacancies to seekers declined. it says 80 positions were open for every 100 job seekers. the industrial output posted an increase in october for the first time in four months. the index stood at 88.1 against a reference value of 1205. this was due to increases in the electronic parts and devices industry as well add the fabricated me
office, bowles has a good reason for saying what he did. the economy would go into a recession, economic output would drop and unemployment rate would go back up to 9.1% by the end of next year. now, the clock is ticking. john and harry, get out of the sand box. 33 days are left. peter difazio of oregon is "outfront" tonight. let me just get a response from you about timothy geithner's plan that he put on the table. 1.6 trillion in revenue. $400 billion in cuts. i'm a little confused because the president said he will give $2.50 in spending cuts for every dollar in revenue. this is, this is the opposite. >> well, finally, the white house has learned not to negotiate with itself, but with the opposition, which is the republicans. remember, there is no real cliff. on january 1st, the only thing that goes away is the social security tax holiday and nobody is seriously talking about continuing that. all the other tax increases don't take place until sometime around march. gives congress plenty of time to rekrit them, but that's $4 trillion of additional revenues. so okay, we're going to cut
of a percentage point in october. the dow finished ahead. the nasdaq lost two. europe's economy remains in the tank. 17 euro zone countries have a combined unemployment rate of 11.7%. that is the highest since the introduction of the common currency in 1999. 18.7 million people are out of work for the euro zone. pain and greece have jobless rates of more than 25%. back at home, the question of who will be the nation's top diplomat in president obama's second term continues to intersect with complaints about how the administration handled the libya terror attack. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge with the continuing saga of what susan rice knew and when she knew it. >> since it's classified briefing on capitol hill two weeks ago, lawmakers stressed that ambassador susan rice had asked for the unclassified intelligence on the benghazi attack, including the controversial c.i.a. talking points, as well as classified information. now leading republican in the senate tells fox that the classified information included the president's daily brief. from the 16 intelligence agen
to inject money in a credit fashion into their economy. and we certainly think we can bring our fixed income expertise and continue to help them. >> that would make sense for cantor. ireland was the mf-will first they were in trouble, then the model for the world. what got them into trouble again, housing or real estate or something or bad banks or -- and now again they're kind of a model for everyone on how to handle it. is that basically the last five years? >> absolutely. certainly was a real estate bubble there. now there are austerity measures being put in place and they're actually following through on the austerity measures. so certainly they'll come out first and actually look pretty good. >> so where is the most business for you for cantor in ireland, what will you be doing? >> certainly it's an equity based firm. we'll bring our fixed income expertise, probably become the primary dealer there. the irish government will continue to have to have bond issuances as well as corporate debt will start to become a much bigger part of their economy. >> who else looked at this firm, do you k
just return to a normal economy like we had in 2007, those policies of george bush where we had 18.5% of our economy coming to the federal government as revenue, that would be another $419 billion. so combined, that would be $750 billion per year of additional revenue. now, president obama's proposal of punishing success, it's hard to say exactly what it will be, but somewhere around $75 billion. it's a tenth of what we get with economic growth. and the rob with punishing success, with increasing marginal tax rates or really increasing taxes, is you put at risk that growth that is ten times more effective. so again, i'm just looking at what works. and we need to calm the markets. i don't want to play brinksmanship. it's a unfortunate that the president really isn't negotiating in good faith. he's just moving the goal posts. >> although the lead story on the "wall street journal" is about how the president may be relaxing that position. he may not insist on returning to the pre-bush tax cut rates for those wealthiest 2% or whatever the situation is. that may not mean that he's not l
to the economy. >> i'm wondering whether germany as we look at -- they're just above sort of recession territory at the moment. i'm wondering whether if they get better growth out of asia, that will offset the weakness that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to
're out with a view on your next year that doesn't sound too rosy. you talk about the economy contracting half a percent. challenges in the core countries. so walk us through how important the german vote is tomorrow and whether greece gets its aid as to the more broad brooutlook. >> the outlook is not improving. it's deteriorating for the eurozone. economic fundamentals are getting worse particularly in the countries of germany and france. these are the countries we revise down the most. in the periphery, there are signs that the recession is stabilizing. we're below the consensus. typical view is that the economy will broadly stagnate next year, we think it will continue to shrink and the ecb will continue to cap interest rates and perhaps at shall point the bond buying program will be in spain. >> and so when we talk about the sequence of events that markets are looking for the next couple of months, the main one still seems to be when spain asks for aid. pushed into the first quarter of next year now in your view? >> i think there are two windows of opportunities really. the first one
, that is good news, you saw growth in economy and in the last few moments we moved higher and we are positive for the week. when you check it out and industrials we are up 44 points and most of those names on the dow are in the green, names like hewlett-packard and caterpillar and bank of america and united healthcare doing well. the fiscal cliff headline after headline continues to be in the forefront and on everybody's mind that this is what we are seeing, a decent market and the u.s. dollar being weaker today has been a factor in the strength we are seeing as well. connell: treasury secretary tim geithner meeting with congressional leaders and doing so as we speak. dagen: peter barnes live from capitol hill. peter: treasury secretary tim geithner arriving at our or so ago to hold meetings with top congressional leaders. senate democratic leader harry reid, now he is meeting with house speaker john boehner, that meeting just getting underway, after that meeting with senate republican leader mitch mcconnell and house democratic leader nancy pelosi and with the president and republicans on ra
're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medica
and is fair. that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations, and i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're going to have to raise a little more revenue. we have to cut spending we don't need. and if we combine those two things, we can create a path where america's paying its bills while still being able to make investments in the things we need to grow like education and infrastructure. we know how to do that but in washington nothing's easy so there's going to be prolonged negotiations and all of us are going to have to get out of our comfort zones to make that happen. i'm willing to do that. i'm hopeful that enough members of congress in both parties are willing to do that, as well. we can solve these problems, but where the clock is really ticking right now is on middle class taxes. at the end of the year, middle class taxes currently in place are set to expire, middle class tax cuts surge in place are set to expire. there are two things that can happen. if conditioning does nothin
can i do? if they say, what do you think? i say, low income rates, economy recovering slowly, housing coming back, if you stay through the turmoil, you'll have higher markets after its over, and maybe much higher so my view is yoo stay invested, broadly diversified, etfs to do it. >> you had me until much higher markets on the other side. what makes you think that? as an investor, it it's a higher tax, straightforward math. if you raise tax on dividends and capital gains, makes stocks less valuable in the long run, a less appetizing choice. you mentioned housing on the way back. holding assets for a long time, buy housing, gold stocks, something to sit? >> well, you have a diversify, and stocks are under owned, one. the monetary policy is predictable for years, and it's a low, low interest rate so now you say what are the relative choices? go by a high grade tax free bond, 3% interest. i can buy stocks, a 2%-plus dividend, could tax higher, but the dividends rise. i can get into a market cheaply if i believe earnings grow over time, say, the rest of the decade. that's my time horizon.
for the workplace. we are not going to be the world's most innovative economy. second, in some ways, more surprising for me, it was brought to us by the former chief of secretary of the army, who talked about the problems in our education system and the relationship to the armed forces. the inability of some 70% of americans actually qualified for service in the armed forces ought to be a red flag for anyone. now, yes, there are other reasons for that. incarceration, obesity, but a fair amount of it is that the people can't pass the basic skills test to get into the military. so just imagine a country -- a developed country, a powerful country in the world. and we can't get the basic tasks. analyzing data secretary of state is realizing how few people how -- how they learn foreign languages, the fact that we don't have people who are prepared to go into the intelligence agency and we are lobbying ourselves appellate in literally the national security infrastructure of the country. so most importantly, it is a tragedy that people will not be prepared for a good job and will therefore have nowhere els
to figure this out. lori: i was speaking with martin felton yesterday of harvard, the u.s. economy is still in serrous danger of falling into a recession. >> i think the fiscal cliff is the single biggest risk. if we avoid that, i think we have a good shot of growing. not rapidly, but between one and 2%. housing is recovering. i think without the fiscal cliff, we will do all right. lori: tax rates or than likely are going up, at least for one class. you have this slow growth. at the same time, think of the federal reserve keeping rates low for so long. we could be in serious trouble. >> on the inflation front, we are not very worried for the next year or two. it is out there, but not the next year or two. they will phase in whatever tax increase they put in. it will not hit next year. it will phase in over a couple years. that is the smart way to do it. lori: thank you for your time. >> thank you. you bet. melissa: i would like to be optimistic. date -- details of the probe have not been released. over 80 people have already been questioned about the more than $5 billion in trading losses l
't know, feeling better and so much of this is about how we feel about the economy. >> oh, yeah. that's right. investors may not like it, but consumers love it. their confidence, the highest level in many, many months. still below 90, which is really the point at which you see a really strong and robust economy. but the fact that consumer confidence has been doing so much better, it's very important. now, here is possibly a source of their optimism. 20% of consumers expect more jobs in the next six months and that would be a cause for much optimism. >> shepard: yes, it would. the fears about europe's debt crisis clearly eased a bit 'cause there is another deal to provide aid to greece. >> more money for greece, $57 billion. it took three weeks to come to this conclusion for european and global leaders to say hey, we'll give you the money. it will come in four installments and if they didn't get this, they would be in bankruptcy. as you know, that would be bad for the entire e.u. that country, greece, has an unemployment rate of 25%. 25. >> shepard: big number. >> it's a very big numbe
cole. >> you're not going to grow the economy if you raise tax rates on the top two rates. it'll hurt small businesses, it'll hurt our economy, it's why it's not the right approach. we're willing to put revenue on the table as long as we're not raising rates. >> brown: despite the president's talk of changing minds, "politico's" manu raju says that privately, house republicans think they can win this fight. >> right now the republican leadership feels pretty confident that they have most of their folks in line. they all generally support keeping tax rates low for virtually for every single income group. they do not want to see incomes increase for that top tax bracket. >> brown: meanwhile, on the senate floor, minority leader mitch mcconnell criticized democrats for putting social security off limits in any deficit deal. >> as for social security, the only thing we hear from why in the world wouldn't they want to talk about the fact that this vital program started spending out more than it took in 2010, for the first time in nearly 30 years and that its trustees now estimate that it w
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